The JavaScript Diaries: Part 5

By Lee Underwood

Nested Loops

You can also nest for statements to obtain greater control and add a variety of tasks. Try this one and see what happens.

  for (var jsNot=0;jsNot<10;jsNot++) {
    document.write("JavaScript is not Java!<br>");
      for (jsNot2=1;jsNot2<2;jsNot2++) {
        document.write("Are you getting this?<br>");
      }
  }

It's a little tedious but you get the picture. Let's take a look at what is happening here:

  1. In the first for statement, the variable jsNot is declared and given a value of 0.
  2. It's then compared with the conditional statement to see if it's less than 10. If the conditional statement is true, the script will print: "JavaScript is not Java!" to the screen. If the conditional statement is false, the loop will end.
  3. If the conditional statement is true, the value of jsNot is increased by 1. The nested loop then begins.
  4. The variable jsNot2 is declared and given a value of 1.
  5. It's then compared with the conditional statement to see if it's less than 2. If the conditional statement is true, the script will print: "Are you getting this?" to the screen. If the conditional statement is false, the loop will end and control will return to the main loop.
  6. If the conditional statement is true, the value of jsNot2 is increased by 1. Since the variable's value is no longer less than 2, the loop ends and control returns to the main loop where the entire process begins again. It's the counter in the main loop that determines when the entire looping process ends.

You can also nest other types of blocks. Let's take a previous script and add an if nesting loop to it:

  for (var newNum=1; newNum<4; newNum++) {
    document.write("This pass is #" + newNum + "<br>");
     if (newNum==3) {
       document.write("That's all she wrote folks!");
     }
  }

In this loop, when the variable newNum equals 3, which would be on its last loop, an if statement is executed. Let's try another one that's a little more complex:

for (var jsNot=0;jsNot<10;jsNot++) {
  if (jsNot==4) {
    document.write("Are you getting this?<br>");
  }
  else if (jsNot==9) {
    document.write("I think you got the point!");
  }
  else {
    document.write("JavaScript is not Java!<br>");
  }
}

The continue and break Commands

You can also control loops using the continue and break commands. These allow you to skip a certain part of the loop, or stop it altogether, if a condition is met. Look at the following script:

  for (var newNum=1; newNum<9; newNum++) {
     if (newNum==5) {
       continue;
     }
    document.write("This pass is #" + newNum + "<br>");
  }
  • The first portion of the loop is what we have seen before. Once the variable is declared, initialized, and the conditional statement is found to be true, the loop moves to the if statement.
  • The if statement says that if the variable newNum is equal to 5, skip the rest of the loop and start at the next increment; otherwise, the remainder of the code for the loop will be executed.

A break command acts a little differently in that it actually stops the loop from executing any additional code within the loop:

  for (var newNum=1; newNum<9; newNum++) {
     if (newNum==5) {
       break;
     }
    document.write("This pass is #" + newNum + "<br>");
  }

In this loop, if the variable newNum is equal to 5, the loop will stop execution completely.

I'm sure you can see how this could be beneficial in many cases. Try them yourself and see what happens.

Nesting loops add another dimension to your programming skills that aid you in creating more effective scripts. Don't be afraid to use them.




Page 7 of 8

Previous Page
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Next Page

Make a Comment

Loading Comments...

  • Web Development Newsletter Signup

    Invalid email
    You have successfuly registered to our newsletter.
  •  
  •  
  •  
Thanks for your registration, follow us on our social networks to keep up-to-date